Le photographe turc Ugur Gallen joue sur les contrastes du monde en faisant coïncider des photos de la banalité de quotidiens très différents. D’un côté la guerre et la misère, de l’autre l’opulence du premier monde. Un message d’espoir désespéré.

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A woman who had been exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam war gave birth to two children, both physically and mentally impaired. She was helping her daughter move her arms for exercise. Vietnam, Mekong Delta, 2012. Agent Orange is a herbicide and defoliant chemical, one of the "tactical use" Rainbow Herbicides. It is widely known for its use by the U.S. military as part of its chemical warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971. It is a mixture of equal parts of two herbicides, 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D. In addition to its damaging environmental effects, traces of dioxin (mainly TCDD, the most toxic of its type) found in the mixture have caused major health problems for many individuals who were exposed. Up to four million people in Vietnam were exposed to the defoliant. The government of Vietnam says as many as three million people have suffered illness because of Agent Orange, and the Red Cross of Vietnam estimates that up to one million people are disabled or have health problems as a result of Agent Orange contamination. The United States government has described these figures as unreliable, while documenting higher cases of leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and various kinds of cancer in exposed US military veterans. An epidemiological study done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that there was an increase in the rate of birth defects of the children of military personnel as a result of Agent Orange. Agent Orange has also caused enormous environmental damage in Vietnam. Over 3,100,000 hectares (31,000 km2) of forest were defoliated. Defoliants eroded tree cover and seedling forest stock, making reforestation difficult in numerous areas. Animal species diversity sharply reduced in contrast with unsprayed areas. Agent Orange was first used by the British Armed Forces in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency. It was also used by the US military in Laos and Cambodia during the Vietnam War because forests near the border with Vietnam were used by the Viet Cong. The herbicide was also used in Brazil to clear out sections of land for agriculture. via Wikipedia Photo: James Nachtwey @jamesnachtwey

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A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular infectious disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins, or one of its surface proteins. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as a threat, destroy it, and to further recognize and destroy any of the microorganisms associated with that agent that it may encounter in the future. The administration of vaccines is called vaccination. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases; widespread immunity due to vaccination is largely responsible for the worldwide eradication of smallpox (only smallpox is estimated to have killed up to 300 million people in the 20th century and around 500 million people in the last 100 years of its existence. The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977, and the World Health Organization (WHO) certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.) and the restriction of diseases such as polio, measles, and tetanus from much of the world. The world's first vaccine was found by Edward Jenner of English physician and scientist in 1798. It was smallpox vaccine. The vaccine was further developed by Louis Pasteur and Maurice Hilleman. Their discoveries have saved many lives ever since. via Wikipedia #ParalelEvrenSava?Bar?? ?

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Bonne ambiance.

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Source : Ugur Gallen